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Interest Calculator

The majority of financial instruments in use today are based on the idea of interest. This is because they are all built on the idea of interest. The payment of interest, which can be stated as a percentage or a set amount, is what the borrower makes to the lender in exchange for the use of money.

The two separate ways to accumulate interest in Canada, these two ways are known as simple interest and compound interest. Calculating interest and ultimate balances for both fixed principal amounts and extra periodic contributions can be done with the use of an interest calculator. The tax on interest income and inflation are two additional optional elements that may be taken into account.

It is evident from the name. In fact, simple interest is a straightforward method for figuring out the interest on a specific amount of borrowed funds. Using the simple interest technique, the total amount of interest paid is determined by multiplying the principle borrowed by the applicable interest rate and the loan’s term.

The principal amount is multiplied by the number of periods and interest rate to determine simple interest. You do not have to pay interest on interest, and simple interest does not compound. In the case of simple interest, the payment is applied to the current month’s interest, and the remaining sum is deducted from the principle.

Your financial life may be impacted by interest in a number of ways:

When borrowing money

Remember that you must pay it back together with interest payments, which serve as the borrowing fee.

When making a deposit

Keep in mind that interest-bearing accounts, like savings accounts, pay interest because you are giving the bank permission to lend out your funds.

When lending money

When extending credit to others, lenders often set a rate and receives interest payments in return.

Interest Calculator - Comparewise

Simple Interest Calculator

A simple interest calculator is a useful tool that computes interest on loans or savings accounts without compounding. On a daily, monthly, or annual basis, you may figure out the simple interest on the principal sum. The easy interest calculator features a formula box where you may enter the principle amount, yearly rate, and time period in days, months, or years. The calculator will show the interest rate for the loan or investment.

How to calculate simple interest

Loan amount

The quantity of the initial principal should be obvious. Based on your creditworthiness and/or particular demands, this is the amount the lender is willing to loan you. This information is contained in the loan agreement that you sign.

Interest rate

The type of loan you arrange with the lender will determine whether the yearly interest rate is fixed or variable. Before you contract the loan, make sure you are aware of the rate you are receiving. With variable rates, the rate paid to the borrower may frequently increase significantly if the macroeconomic environment in the specific nation changes. By reading the loan agreement or getting in touch with your lender directly, you may learn your rate.

Unit of time

The loan contract will usually specify the unit of time, which can be defined in days, months, or years. In the unlikely event that you are given a loan’s term in weeks, just increase it by 7 to get days.

Loan duration

Last but not least, the loan term is a crucial factor since, generally speaking, the longer the period, the more interest will accumulate. It could be to your best advantage to repay a loan sooner if you can afford to do so in order to avoid paying higher interest rates.

The accumulated amount, which includes both principle and interest, will be displayed by the simple interest calculator. The simple interest calculator uses the following equation:

A = P (1+rt)

P = Principal Amount is.

R = interest rate.

T = the number of years.

A = Total amount accumulated (Both principal and the interest)

You may have run upon this in a few locations during your daily life. For instance, the interest structure for your vehicle loan is probably rather straightforward. If you paid $10,000 for your automobile at 7% interest over five years, you are probably paying $700 in interest payments every year.

Fixed-rate vs. variable rate

Without a doubt, the most significant component of every loan is the interest rate. Prospective borrowers may opt to take out a loan or find another way to fund their necessary expenses depending on how enticing the interest rate is.

Not all rates, though, are made equal. It is crucial for borrowers to understand the distinction between fixed and variable interest rates. Both have advantages and disadvantages, but a fixed rate is typically preferred for budgeting reasons because the amount that the borrower pays each period won’t fluctuate. 

Compound Interest

The interest you receive is known as compound interest, and it is earned on both your initial investment and interest that has accrued over time. Compounded interest is “interest on interest,” to put it another way. Simple interest is a different approach to computing interest in which interest is simply accrued on the initial principal. Compounding allows you to earn interest on previously earned interest, so your investment or savings return will be bigger than it would be with a straightforward interest calculation.

Compounding is an effective strategy for savers and investors, but it won’t miraculously increase your return. Time is another important component in compounding. The longer your money is invested, the higher the return will be since you’ll have more time for the interest you’ve already accrued to grow.

Compound interest may be an advantage or disadvantage to you if you are either borrowing money or saving it. Compound interest on a loan works against you since it causes you to accumulate greater debt. For instance, the majority of American credit card companies may use daily compounding to determine your interest costs. That’s not the situation in Canada, though. The majority of Canadian credit card companies don’t compound interest on cards.

Compound interest on investment works in your favor since your money is growing. This calculator for compound interest is intended for investors and savers who want to figure out how much interest they can get on their money by compounding.

Compound interest in Canada

Mortgage

In Canada, mortgages are compounded semi-annually to determine the interest rate on fixed-rate mortgages. For variable mortgages, some lenders might compound interest more regularly. As a result, your effective annual rate (EAR) will be greater than the mortgage rate that was quoted.

Credit card

On credit card balances, the majority of Canadian credit card providers do not apply compound interest. Instead, monthly interest payments are made and daily interest is calculated. The interest on the accrued interest will not be levied if you do not pay off the entire sum on your credit card. For Canadian credit cards, this means that interest is typically not compounded. In early 2020, TD announced that it would begin charging compound interest on TD credit cards, making TD the lone exception to this regulation.

In Canada, the amount of interest that will be added to your credit card debt is based on the average daily balance. To figure it out, divide the total daily balance by the number of days in the statement month. For instance, in a month of 30-days, if you have $200 in the first fifteen days and $300 in the second fifteen days, the average daily balance would be $250. Therefore, the average daily balance of $250 would be used to calculate interest.

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How to calculate compound interest

To calculate compound interest, you need the three pieces of information shown below:

The principal

The starting sum of money on which interest will be generated is called the principal.

The interest rate

This is the interest that would be paid on your investments or savings. It can be provided as an annual rate, but to compute compound interest properly, you must change it to a periodic rate.

The frequency of compounding

How frequently interest will be compounded.

 Let’s assume for the purposes of calculation; “A” represents the whole sum of your investment, as determined for you using a compound interest calculator. This covers both your initial principle and any compounded interest. Your starting principal is “P”, your interest rate, “r”, is expressed as a decimal, and “t” is the number of years you wish to calculate. The amount “n” represents the number of times interest is compounded annually. For instance, if interest is compounded monthly, it would do so 12 times a year.

Daily compound interest vs. monthly compound interest

The amount of time between interest calculations determines whether daily or monthly compounding is used. Interest is computed once a month when using monthly compounding. Your account balance at the end of the first month would be $1,008.33 if you invested $1,000 and received 10% yearly interest.

This is due to the fact that a 10% yearly rate is equivalent to a 0.833% monthly rate, which is the periodic rate used in the computation. The new amount of $1,008.33 would be subject to interest calculations the following month, resulting in a balance of $1,016.73 (from $1,008.33 + $8.40) at the end of the second month.

This information can also be obtained using a monthly compound interest calculator. Notably, interest revenue for the first month was $8.33 whereas it was $8.40 for the second. Compounding is to thank you for the additional $0.07 interest collected!

365 times a year are used to compute interest when it is compounded daily (or 366 times during a leap year). To use a daily compound interest calculator and the similar example as before, the daily interest rate would be 10% divided by the total number of days in a year which is 365, or 0.0274%.

The next day interest would be computed on the new balance of $1,000.274. The interest would be computed the following day on the new balance of $1,000.274. Your account balance would be $1,008.37 at the end of the month just a little bit more than with monthly compounding after this procedure had continued for the entire month.

With daily compounding, you would therefore make $8.37 in your first month. In contrast, monthly compounding would have resulted in an initial profit of $8.33. On a $1,000 investment, you would make an extra $0.04 in one month if compounded daily rather than monthly.

Even though it might not seem like much, the distinction between daily and monthly compounding can have a big long-term impact. Depending on how often interest is compounded, your account balance will increase at a different rate. The impact of compounding will be greater the longer you let your investment develop with a longer time frame.

Nominal interest rate vs. Effective interest rate

When making the decision to save or invest, it is essential to comprehend the distinction between the nominal interest rate and the effective interest rate. The rate that is quoted is called the nominal interest rate. There is no consideration for the implications of compounding. The real return on your investment when compounding is taken into account is the effective interest rate. Sometimes people refer to it as the effective yearly rate.

The effective interest rate is always on the high side compared to the nominal interest rate. This is due to the fact that interest is earned by compounding on both the original principal as well as the interest that has accrued over time.

Continuous compounding interest

The concept of continuous compounding states that interest will continue to grow over time By reducing the time between cumulative periods from minutes to seconds and even less, the effective yearly rate finally approaches a position where interest is accumulated continuously.

Although it would be difficult to locate a bank that does so, the concept of continuous compounding is applied in finance. For instance, the Black-Scholes options pricing model discounts the option’s strike price using the continuously compounded risk-free rate of return.

Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR)

The yearly rate of return on an investment over a specific period of time is calculated using a formula known as the compound annual growth rate, or CAGR. CAGR is a useful metric for comparing investments with various starting and ending values across various periods. To compute CAGR, you must know the worth of investment both at the start and end of the term. The needed compounded growth rate (CAGR) is the amount of time it takes for your starting investment to increase to a specific ultimate value.

Rule of 72

The rule of 72 is a formula for calculating how long it would take to get your money doubled at a particular interest rate. The rule of 72, in more precise terms, mandates that interest be compounded once a year. To calculate how long it will take to get your money doubled, divide 72 by the interest rate. It would take 8 years for your money to double if your interest rate was 9%, for instance.

The Rule of 72 would be applied for annual compounding as it is the formula that is most frequently used. The recipe would need to be altered for other compounding frequencies. Consequently, the investment would double more quickly if compounding occurred more frequently.

The Rule of 72 would be applied for annual compounding as it is the formula that is most frequently used.

Rule of 69, Rule of 70, or Rule of 72?

The Rule of 69 is used in continuous compounding. Rule of 70 would be applied to daily compounding. The Rule of 72, however, would be a decent approximation for the majority of assets in most circumstances. Thanks for checking out our insurance calculator!

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The majority of financial instruments in use today are based on the idea of interest. This is because they are all built on the idea of interest. The payment of interest, which can be stated as a percentage or a set amount, is what the borrower makes to the lender in exchange for the use of money.

The two separate ways to accumulate interest in Canada, these two ways are known as simple interest and compound interest. Calculating interest and ultimate balances for both fixed principal amounts and extra periodic contributions can be done with the use of an interest calculator. The tax on interest income and inflation are two additional optional elements that may be taken into account.

It is evident from the name. In fact, simple interest is a straightforward method for figuring out the interest on a specific amount of borrowed funds. Using the simple interest technique, the total amount of interest paid is determined by multiplying the principle borrowed by the applicable interest rate and the loan’s term.

The principal amount is multiplied by the number of periods and interest rate to determine simple interest. You do not have to pay interest on interest, and simple interest does not compound. In the case of simple interest, the payment is applied to the current month’s interest, and the remaining sum is deducted from the principle.

Your financial life may be impacted by interest in a number of ways:

When borrowing money

Remember that you must pay it back together with interest payments, which serve as the borrowing fee.

When making a deposit

Keep in mind that interest-bearing accounts, like savings accounts, pay interest because you are giving the bank permission to lend out your funds.

When lending money

When extending credit to others, lenders often set a rate and receives interest payments in return.

Interest Calculator - Comparewise

Simple Interest Calculator

A simple interest calculator is a useful tool that computes interest on loans or savings accounts without compounding. On a daily, monthly, or annual basis, you may figure out the simple interest on the principal sum. The easy interest calculator features a formula box where you may enter the principle amount, yearly rate, and time period in days, months, or years. The calculator will show the interest rate for the loan or investment.

How to calculate simple interest

Loan amount

The quantity of the initial principal should be obvious. Based on your creditworthiness and/or particular demands, this is the amount the lender is willing to loan you. This information is contained in the loan agreement that you sign.

Interest rate

The type of loan you arrange with the lender will determine whether the yearly interest rate is fixed or variable. Before you contract the loan, make sure you are aware of the rate you are receiving. With variable rates, the rate paid to the borrower may frequently increase significantly if the macroeconomic environment in the specific nation changes. By reading the loan agreement or getting in touch with your lender directly, you may learn your rate.

Unit of time

The loan contract will usually specify the unit of time, which can be defined in days, months, or years. In the unlikely event that you are given a loan’s term in weeks, just increase it by 7 to get days.

Loan duration

Last but not least, the loan term is a crucial factor since, generally speaking, the longer the period, the more interest will accumulate. It could be to your best advantage to repay a loan sooner if you can afford to do so in order to avoid paying higher interest rates.

The accumulated amount, which includes both principle and interest, will be displayed by the simple interest calculator. The simple interest calculator uses the following equation:

A = P (1+rt)

P = Principal Amount is.

R = interest rate.

T = the number of years.

A = Total amount accumulated (Both principal and the interest)

You may have run upon this in a few locations during your daily life. For instance, the interest structure for your vehicle loan is probably rather straightforward. If you paid $10,000 for your automobile at 7% interest over five years, you are probably paying $700 in interest payments every year.

Fixed-rate vs. variable rate

Without a doubt, the most significant component of every loan is the interest rate. Prospective borrowers may opt to take out a loan or find another way to fund their necessary expenses depending on how enticing the interest rate is.

Not all rates, though, are made equal. It is crucial for borrowers to understand the distinction between fixed and variable interest rates. Both have advantages and disadvantages, but a fixed rate is typically preferred for budgeting reasons because the amount that the borrower pays each period won’t fluctuate. 

Compound Interest

The interest you receive is known as compound interest, and it is earned on both your initial investment and interest that has accrued over time. Compounded interest is “interest on interest,” to put it another way. Simple interest is a different approach to computing interest in which interest is simply accrued on the initial principal. Compounding allows you to earn interest on previously earned interest, so your investment or savings return will be bigger than it would be with a straightforward interest calculation.

Compounding is an effective strategy for savers and investors, but it won’t miraculously increase your return. Time is another important component in compounding. The longer your money is invested, the higher the return will be since you’ll have more time for the interest you’ve already accrued to grow.

Compound interest may be an advantage or disadvantage to you if you are either borrowing money or saving it. Compound interest on a loan works against you since it causes you to accumulate greater debt. For instance, the majority of American credit card companies may use daily compounding to determine your interest costs. That’s not the situation in Canada, though. The majority of Canadian credit card companies don’t compound interest on cards.

Compound interest on investment works in your favor since your money is growing. This calculator for compound interest is intended for investors and savers who want to figure out how much interest they can get on their money by compounding.

Compound interest in Canada

Mortgage

In Canada, mortgages are compounded semi-annually to determine the interest rate on fixed-rate mortgages. For variable mortgages, some lenders might compound interest more regularly. As a result, your effective annual rate (EAR) will be greater than the mortgage rate that was quoted.

Credit card

On credit card balances, the majority of Canadian credit card providers do not apply compound interest. Instead, monthly interest payments are made and daily interest is calculated. The interest on the accrued interest will not be levied if you do not pay off the entire sum on your credit card. For Canadian credit cards, this means that interest is typically not compounded. In early 2020, TD announced that it would begin charging compound interest on TD credit cards, making TD the lone exception to this regulation.

In Canada, the amount of interest that will be added to your credit card debt is based on the average daily balance. To figure it out, divide the total daily balance by the number of days in the statement month. For instance, in a month of 30-days, if you have $200 in the first fifteen days and $300 in the second fifteen days, the average daily balance would be $250. Therefore, the average daily balance of $250 would be used to calculate interest.

Cmhc Insurance Calculator - Comparewise

How to calculate compound interest

To calculate compound interest, you need the three pieces of information shown below:

The principal

The starting sum of money on which interest will be generated is called the principal.

The interest rate

This is the interest that would be paid on your investments or savings. It can be provided as an annual rate, but to compute compound interest properly, you must change it to a periodic rate.

The frequency of compounding

How frequently interest will be compounded.

 Let’s assume for the purposes of calculation; “A” represents the whole sum of your investment, as determined for you using a compound interest calculator. This covers both your initial principle and any compounded interest. Your starting principal is “P”, your interest rate, “r”, is expressed as a decimal, and “t” is the number of years you wish to calculate. The amount “n” represents the number of times interest is compounded annually. For instance, if interest is compounded monthly, it would do so 12 times a year.

Daily compound interest vs. monthly compound interest

The amount of time between interest calculations determines whether daily or monthly compounding is used. Interest is computed once a month when using monthly compounding. Your account balance at the end of the first month would be $1,008.33 if you invested $1,000 and received 10% yearly interest.

This is due to the fact that a 10% yearly rate is equivalent to a 0.833% monthly rate, which is the periodic rate used in the computation. The new amount of $1,008.33 would be subject to interest calculations the following month, resulting in a balance of $1,016.73 (from $1,008.33 + $8.40) at the end of the second month.

This information can also be obtained using a monthly compound interest calculator. Notably, interest revenue for the first month was $8.33 whereas it was $8.40 for the second. Compounding is to thank you for the additional $0.07 interest collected!

365 times a year are used to compute interest when it is compounded daily (or 366 times during a leap year). To use a daily compound interest calculator and the similar example as before, the daily interest rate would be 10% divided by the total number of days in a year which is 365, or 0.0274%.

The next day interest would be computed on the new balance of $1,000.274. The interest would be computed the following day on the new balance of $1,000.274. Your account balance would be $1,008.37 at the end of the month just a little bit more than with monthly compounding after this procedure had continued for the entire month.

With daily compounding, you would therefore make $8.37 in your first month. In contrast, monthly compounding would have resulted in an initial profit of $8.33. On a $1,000 investment, you would make an extra $0.04 in one month if compounded daily rather than monthly.

Even though it might not seem like much, the distinction between daily and monthly compounding can have a big long-term impact. Depending on how often interest is compounded, your account balance will increase at a different rate. The impact of compounding will be greater the longer you let your investment develop with a longer time frame.

Nominal interest rate vs. Effective interest rate

When making the decision to save or invest, it is essential to comprehend the distinction between the nominal interest rate and the effective interest rate. The rate that is quoted is called the nominal interest rate. There is no consideration for the implications of compounding. The real return on your investment when compounding is taken into account is the effective interest rate. Sometimes people refer to it as the effective yearly rate.

The effective interest rate is always on the high side compared to the nominal interest rate. This is due to the fact that interest is earned by compounding on both the original principal as well as the interest that has accrued over time.

Continuous compounding interest

The concept of continuous compounding states that interest will continue to grow over time By reducing the time between cumulative periods from minutes to seconds and even less, the effective yearly rate finally approaches a position where interest is accumulated continuously.

Although it would be difficult to locate a bank that does so, the concept of continuous compounding is applied in finance. For instance, the Black-Scholes options pricing model discounts the option’s strike price using the continuously compounded risk-free rate of return.

Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR)

The yearly rate of return on an investment over a specific period of time is calculated using a formula known as the compound annual growth rate, or CAGR. CAGR is a useful metric for comparing investments with various starting and ending values across various periods. To compute CAGR, you must know the worth of investment both at the start and end of the term. The needed compounded growth rate (CAGR) is the amount of time it takes for your starting investment to increase to a specific ultimate value.

Rule of 72

The rule of 72 is a formula for calculating how long it would take to get your money doubled at a particular interest rate. The rule of 72, in more precise terms, mandates that interest be compounded once a year. To calculate how long it will take to get your money doubled, divide 72 by the interest rate. It would take 8 years for your money to double if your interest rate was 9%, for instance.

The Rule of 72 would be applied for annual compounding as it is the formula that is most frequently used. The recipe would need to be altered for other compounding frequencies. Consequently, the investment would double more quickly if compounding occurred more frequently.

The Rule of 72 would be applied for annual compounding as it is the formula that is most frequently used.

Rule of 69, Rule of 70, or Rule of 72?

The Rule of 69 is used in continuous compounding. Rule of 70 would be applied to daily compounding. The Rule of 72, however, would be a decent approximation for the majority of assets in most circumstances. Thanks for checking out our insurance calculator!

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July 28, 2022
Fact Checked

FAQs about our
Interest Calculator

Have a different question? Contact us today.

Is keeping money in a savings account the best option for me?

A savings account is a great, risk-free choice if you anticipate needing access to your money soon. A Guaranteed Investment Certificate (GIC) may, however, give a greater interest rate if you’re prepared to keep your money aside for a longer period of time, depending on the market. To find the best approach to protect and increase your money, you can also investigate various investing techniques like bonds, mutual funds, and Tax-Free Savings Accounts (TFSA).

Are there other calculators available?

There are a range of calculators and plenty of information on Comparewise to help you determine how much money you can borrow, how different loan options stack up against each other, what your credit limit should be and how long it will take to pay off your credit card debt.

How are simple interest payments calculated?

Calculating the periodic payment you must make is rather simple once you have determined the total amount of interest you will pay on a simple interest loan. Simply multiply the stated amount by the entire number of periods. To calculate the monthly interest payment, divide the total interest by 36, for a loan with a term of three years and monthly interest.

How does compound interest work?

When interest is accrued both on the principal balance and the interest already earned, this is known as compound interest. This is distinct from simple interest, where you simply receive interest on the amount you save and pay a fixed rate of interest on the principal.

What is compound interest?

Compound interest is the term used when interest is charged on both the principle balance and the interest that is currently being paid. This is distinct from simple interest, where you simply earn a fixed rate of interest on the principal of the money you save.

How is a simple interest loan calculated?

To calculate the Simple interest of a loan with terms of one year or longer, there are some parameters to make up the solution. These parameters are Principal, Annual Interest Rate, and the term. So mathematically; Interest = principal x annual interest rate x term.

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